New York City’s 911 Memorial, a Solemn Place

Photo by Richard Varr

Photo by Richard Varr

I hadn’t been back to New York’s World Trade Center site in lower Manhattan for more than 10 years when it was – sad to say – still a hole in the ground, and well before the 911 Memorial was completed. Although it bothers me deeply to think about that tragic day in 2001, I thought it was about time I visit the site once more to see the completed memorial.

Photo by Richard Varr

It didn’t take long to feel the strong sense of sorrow as I walked along the grounds, passing others with hardly a word spoken – an awkward silence is how a local most accurately described it to me. The memorial includes the two pools in the large square footprints where the two towers once stood. Each has 30-foot waterfalls with water further plunging into a deeper center square.

Photo by Richard Varr

The names of the nearly 3,000 victims of that clear September day are inscribed in bronze panels along the perimeters of the two pools. They include not only the workers and first responders who perished in the towers, but also the victims of the Pentagon attack and the four doomed airplanes, including the one that crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. I saw pristine white and deep red roses wedged into some of the engraved names, later learning that victims get a rose on their birthdays.

911 Memorial Museum. Photo by Richard Varr

To one side of the grounds is the 911 Memorial Museum housed in a multi-sided, modern glass building. I just couldn’t bring myself to enter the museum. Like most of us, I watched coverage of the horrific event for three days and simply found it hard to relive it all by seeing the crushed and burned artifacts, including the recovered personal items from many of the victims.

Freedom Tower. Photo by Richard Varr

On a brighter note, I loved standing under the Freedom Tower with its twisting glass sides – a symbol of hope, recovery and resilience. As a native New Yorker, it was uplifting to see. Also on the site is the new World Trade Center Mall opened in 2016, with a sprawling white 160-foot-high “Oculus” design shaped to signify a dove being released.

Mall outer design. “Photo by Richard Varr

And a side note… adjacent to the 911 Memorial site is St. Paul’s Chapel of Trinity Church, dating back to 1766. The church today looks the same as I recall it years ago – seemingly untouched – having survived the devastation of September 11, 2001.

St. Paul’s Chapel. Photo by Richard Varr

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